Your Subwoofer may be very good, but it probably won't be AS good as your regular speakers in rendering something so precise as human speech! So the job of the Crossover is to "filter" the audio intended for each speaker so that the Bass frequencies are actually sent to the Subwoofer, and the remaining, higher frequencies go to that speaker. We've already talked about the importance of room dimensions vs. the wavelengths of the various Bass frequencies for example. If these are the speakers you have to work with, then, of course, this is a problem you will have to live with. Bass Control computes the best possible results for the crossover frequency that is assigned by default but the user has to choose it... so that some experimentation is possible and in some cases necessary. A typical value for a 2-way crossover frequency is 2000-3000 Hz. The result isn't satisfactory because of the reported suckout around 80/90 Hz. Among these is the crossover frequency (low-pass). At the crossover point, power to each speaker is reduced -3dB (1/2) so total sound energy is 1. If there's any male dialog in those speaker channels, a 160 Hz Crossover will steer it to the Subwoofer. Or, of course, you could upgrade to better speakers! So suppose you think through all this and discover you actually DO have a range of candidates to choose between? Copyright 2018 BlackSkye Media LLC. And even for speakers that DO plug in, unless they have large Bass driver elements (cones) and dedicated amplification for those, they are not going to hold their own against a decent Subwoofer. What speaker crossover frequency are you using for your home theater? -- experienced 60 Hz, power line interference hum, at one time or another. If they are rated down to 30 Hz, the Crossover Frequency should be no lower than 60 Hz. High-Pass Crossover is the frequency above the low-pass crossover where your speakers will start working and take over from a subwoofer. The high‑pass filter only lets high‑frequency signals (for example, above 2kHz) through to feed the tweeter. Some of the major manufacturers of Subwoofers have helpful tools on their websites you can use to figure out just how big of a Subwoofer you should get from them -- based on the dimensions of your listening room. PA Management does the same thing as a crossover, but it has additional features which is why it "manages your PA." If they are rated down to 30 Hz, the Crossover Frequency should be no lower than 60 Hz. For a 50 Hz wave, 1,130/50 = 22.6 ft.) ... AIR15s, and AIR18s, are equipped with a variable lowpass filter, allowing you to dial in the best crossover point for your system. And so even ONE Subwoofer can handle the Bass from ALL the regular speakers without confusing the audio imaging. From my post on Calibration Discs, you'll recall that multi-channel audio tracks frequently (but not always) include a Low Frequency Effects (LFE) channel. Because your Subwoofer(s) and your regular speakers are, themselves, located in different spots in the room. Since they are smaller, they are also often less expensive. And in between, they SHARE the job of reproducing the audio! In essence the Subwoofer supports the low-end of every speaker (along with handling the special, LFE Bass audio). This is the "pressurization" of the room I've alluded to several times  And the different dimensions of the room --its height, width, and depth -- result in DIFFERENT Standing Waves. →. My HSU Research speakers are rated down to 60 Hz. To wit: You have to huff A LOT of air to "pressurize" an entire listening room at these low, Bass frequencies! A good starting place is with the high-pass filters on the front and rear channels set at 100 Hz, and the subwoofer channel's low-pass filter also set at 100 Hz. Our ears are most sensitive to detail between 300Hz to 3kHz. Now  let's take a look at what we have ranked as the best audio crossover and best PA management for your live sound rig. Positioning it closer to a corner does this even more so. Crossovers. Low-Pass Crossover is the frequency where your subwoofers will start working to reach deep notes that aren’t possible for the speakers that we have today. So their different locations are not a problem, and can, in fact, produce other benefits! You can get two (or more) of a smaller model and position them around your room to work as a set. ... Plug the main outputs of your console into the GEQ, then into the inputs of the crossover. The thing to know is, the choice here has NOTHING TO DO with the physical size of your speakers! The other night at a gig during the set break while ipod music was playing thru the PA I had a tweak of the crossover … If you’re getting a powered subwoofer, then it will probably come equipped with an active built-in crossover, but you’ll want to check to be sure. You can use my Contact page to send a message anytime. Making changes and measuring with an active crossover or digital crossover is easy and painless. A Large speaker will not -- the full range of frequencies in its audio channel will be sent to that speaker. Among other things, this keeps them from hopping around as that cone moves! I mentioned up top using multiple Subwoofers (perhaps in lieu of one single, larger Subwoofer) could have additional advantages beyond simple convenience. Even taking into consideration these tools are designed to be conservative (after all, they'd really like you to pay for a bigger, more expensive model), the size of Subwoofer you'll find recommended for typical listening rooms can be daunting. What if my SUBWOOFER doesn't go HIGH enough? The Bass comes "from everywhere" instead of from the location of any speaker. Other features of crossover units In addition to frequency separation, crossover units can have other functions. If they are rated down to 50 Hz, the Crossover Frequency should be no lower than 100 Hz, If you think about that, some problems should immediately jump to mind! Home Theater Subwoofers have cone diameters in the range roughly 10-18 inches, and, equally important, they have power amps built in, dedicated solely to moving that big cone. If they are rated down to 30 Hz, the Crossover Frequency should be no lower than 60 Hz. The PROBLEM derives from those Bass audio Standing Waves I described up top. This audio doesn't vanish, of course:  THAT'S the audio that's getting steered to the Subwoofer! Again, this can be done because each of them is trying to pressurize that same room rather than producing "localizable" sound. The Dynamic Subwoofers are capable of much higher output for their size, but they aren't all that accurate. 2-way speakers use 2 speakers on each channel and a crossover to divide the audio frequencies reproduced between the two. But again, expect to have to go up in size (and price!) And most of us have -- alas! Given the lowest frequency response of your speakers and crossover options your receiver offers, I'd say the ideal crossover point would be 150hz. "Steering" bass from the regular speaker channels to the Subwoofer is the job of "Crossover" processing. What if my regular speakers don't go low enough? If you know your speaker’s frequency range, set the crossover point roughly 10 Hz above the lowest frequency your speakers can handle cleanly; The most common crossover frequency recommended (and the THX standard) is 80 Hz. It is best for low-end bass. I have a pair of JBL SR4722x mains and SR4718x subs. All the Crossovers and PA Management hardware on this list have 6 XLR outputs so you can connect high, mid, and low speakers to your rig. If you do not need mids as you only have high and low speakers, each unit will still work for your rig by not using the mid outputs. A crossover unit enables you to get a great sound because you are giving the right frequencies to the right speakers so they can do the best job of creating the sound. So you'll have a Subwoofer built into each such speaker, plus another, stand alone Subwoofer for LFE.). We can be contacted through our contact us page found here. If you have bookshelf speakers. However, folks who have invested good money in regular speakers, don't want the low end of those speaker channels compromised by inaccurate Bass reproduction! So for example, are the main speakers really good down to 50 Hz or lower? The problem is, they may be able to produce sound down that low, but they won't be able to do so AT VOLUME! But what's more, it's also possible your Subwoofer is not even CAPABLE of reproducing frequencies as high as 160 Hz! But it is also a sensitive enough test you may very well hear significant differences in the amount of Volume variation which happens across that frequency sweep for the different Crossover Frequencies! My choice in crossover for my receiver is 80, 100, or 120. If you do, then the content below the crossover frequency you set will be sent to the front L and R. But, if all 5 of your speakers are identical then there is no benefit in doing that. My Pa consists of Tapco thump tops and Wharfedale SVP15PB subs.I have had my crossover set at 120hz since forever and always thought it sounded pretty good. even MORE to get a Musical design which also has Bass extension that low. Let's take a look at the differences between crossovers and PA management: Crossovers take a signal from your mixer that is a left and right channel, and separates them so you can separate signals to different speakers based upon frequencies. And raising or lowering the Crossover Frequency changes how MUCH Bass is coming out of the Subwoofer vs. the regular speakers across those shared frequencies. Typically, a low-pass crossover is anywhere from 40Hz and could go up to 60Hz to 100Hz. I guess experimentation is in order to determine if dialog is improved by adjusting the center channel speaker equalizer settings in the 1-4 kHz range; AND, then playing with the crossover frequency of the center channel speaker to see if increasing the crossover to, say, 120 Hz helps the dialog clarity. I'll have more to say about Bass Management and Room Response in future posts, but as I said up top:  The road to awesome Bass begins here! Speakers that can handle the full optimal range are referred to as "full range". Live Sound Reinforcement ... (To calculate how long an audio wave is, divide the speed of sound—1,130 ft./second—by the frequency. they may be rated only down to 80 Hz. Instead the Crossover rolls into effect GRADUALLY -- over a range of frequencies. Some speaker makers also sell "satellite" Subwoofers, which are separate units intended to be attached to a single speaker, each -- and thus functioning AS IF a Subwoofer was built into each such single speaker. If you try to push things too far -- say setting the Crossover at 50Hz in this example, trying to take a little more advantage of the "down to 30 Hz" goodness of your regular speakers -- you may bypass the low-end protection in the Crossover and send 25 Hz audio (or even lower) to that Subwoofer! And this should start you thinking, "How do I get the Bass audio into it?". I have a subwoofer with a crossover frequency 50-150hz. The Rockville RPG15 offers a great sound quality in its simply amazing output. Crossover frequency. As we've just discussed, if you do happen to have a decent Subwoofer, you should be using it to support the low Bass in *ALL* your speakers -- even speakers you have purchased which are marketed as "full range". Recent design trends are for power to be decreased to -6dB (1/4) to each speaker at the crossover point. Picture in your mind the dimensions of your Home Theater viewing room:  Front to Back, Side to Side, and Floor to Ceiling. C-A also plays a role in sound exposure and noise pollution applications. "High … This rather unfortunate nomenclature has become pretty much industry-standard. Which Crossover Frequency do you pick? A common, pseudo-technical description of Bass audio constrained inside a room like this is that the Bass audio "pressurizes" the entire volume of the listening room. So the LOWER limit for the Crossover Frequency would be TWICE the bottom end of your regular speakers. A typical Crossover Frequency would be 80 Hz. The lowest frequencies you'll "hear" will be around 30 Hz. Subwoofers are also huge -- both in size and weight. If everything is working RIGHT that sweep tone will appear to have constant Volume from end to end across the frequencies (except for the very lowest Bass frequencies which will drop off because they can not be heard). Welcome to Sound Certified! At the low frequency end it will come entirely from the Subwoofer (due to the Crossover processing). I just upgraded to a bigger subwoofer, a JBL ES250P rated at 400 watts RMS and 700 watts peak power. We've already talked about ONE problem with that. "Fire Maidens of Outer Space" (1956) on Blu-ray -- The Point 'N Laugh Experience! But bass doesn't stop there! That thud you feel in your gut from a really deep effects sound, or perhaps from the lowest pedal notes of a pipe organ, are found down here! Some subwoofers also … But there's ALSO the issue of how that speaker "couples" to the room. Many car audio stereo receivers on the market feature an integrated and user-adjustable crossover system, designed to route certain sound frequency ranges to specific speakers connected directly to the head unit, or through low-level outputs designated for external audio amplifiers. And THIS is where we start to run into the REAL complications of Bass Management! Visit my About page to read about who I am and what I do. And THAT means you want to know that your regular speakers are CAPABLE of producing good audio all the way down to 40 Hz! This means at no additional cost to you, I get paid if you click through and make a purchase). A loudspeaker system without a properly designed crossover (or none at all) can cause too much frequency overlap between drivers which can increase distortion and degrade overall sound quality. If you have got a cheap speaker, which does not sound pretty well or fascinating, at least to you, then modifying your crossovers could help your car audio system sound better. So if you have "full range" speakers -- rated down to 30 Hz for example -- you do NOT want to set the Crossover at 30 Hz. One of those sciencey facts you probably have stashed away from school is the sounds we hear are made up of repeating, pressure "waves" traveling through the air to our ears. My HSU Research speakers are rated down to 60 Hz. And thus you would set these speakers all to Small -- regardless of their actual size! Instead, you are simply specifying whether or not you want Crossover processing to happen. In addition -- see below -- you will *STILL* need a separate Subwoofer for proper handling of Low Frequency Effects (LFE) Bass! There are some things to consider regarding the shape of the room and how the speakers will interact with boundaries, such as the walls, the ceiling, and the floor.You want to get the best speakers your budget will allow. Sending a full-range signal to all speakers within the system, regardless of each speaker’s design, can be problematic. This effect is called the Bass Room Response of the room. The best crossover frequencies for this setup will be: Sub: Set the low-pass filter to 80 Hz (with a slope of 12/24 dB) Rear coaxial drivers: Set the high-pass filter to 80 Hz (with a slope of 12/24 dB) At the low frequency end, suppose you have speakers rated down to 30 Hz. Need anything? The highest frequency a subwoofer is capable of handling is the highest frequency you should use for the crossover settings. And what's the top end (and low end) the Subwoofer can handle? If the width and depth of the room are different, positions close to the rear wall (near the TV screen) will couple differently than positions close to a side wall. The crossover frequency is the frequency at which sound transitions from one speaker to another. This a good low-pass frequency that ensures the subwoofer bass is prioritized without including any midrange sounds. Visit my About page to read about who I am and what I do. And that might be only, say, 120 Hz! In my experience, it's best to set the low crossover point below the vocal frequency range and set the high crossover point no lower than 2.5kHz. Crossovers are devices that split your signal in two — low frequencies go to the subs and everything else goes to the mains. Need anything? And you'll recall from that table linked above, this is a "safe" frequency for Bass steering, since the wavelengths of audio 80 Hz and lower are going to be long enough to trigger that "pressurizing" effect -- i.e.,to be "non-localizable". Setting a crossover point in the middle of the vocal range can mess up the vocal sound, especially if you use radically different compression settings on each side of the crossover frequency. But there's an alternative. So now we have a range of possible Crossover Frequency candidates. And those different Standing Waves *INTERACT*! And the natural averaging effect of all this can be a big help in reducing Resonance Peaks and Cancellation Nulls. What if my regular speakers don't go low enough? That is, you can now "localize" the audio, in your mind, as coming from the direction of one of your speakers. This will ensure a smooth frequency response when the drivers are combined. The sub specs say it can play down to 25 Hz, which is very low, and the sub has a crossover adjustment that goes from 50 Hz to 150 Hz. Indeed, your regular speakers already include their own, internal Crossover electronics to split the audio among their various driver elements:  Tweeter, Mid-range, and Woofer for example. That is to say, at 80 Hz and above, the regular speaker is carrying the audio. Firstly, on most ecommerce websites, they mention another option called PA management. Copyright ©2018-2021 Bob Pariseau. And that means you need both size AND power in the speaker doing the huffing! You may also encounter asymmetric filters where the high pass and low pass filters each use different corner frequencies… If I am understanding this correctly, it is a borderline choice between 80 or 100. I just upgraded to a bigger subwoofer, a JBL ES250P rated at 400 watts RMS and 700 watts peak power. For domestic use at low power crossing tweeters over between 2kHz - 3kHz is often done in 2 way systems. A 3-way crossover design adds a band-pass filter that selects midrange frequencies for the … I.e., one of those less expensive Home Theater "Dynamic" Subwoofers I described above? The impact will vary both by Bass frequency and listening position. And by the time you get down to 50 Hz audio (see that table), the wavelength is likely bigger than ALL THREE dimensions of your room. Where the different Standing Waves happen to match up you get "Resonance Peaks" -- a boost in level of that Bass frequency. So if you have a Crossover which begins at 80 Hz, and takes effect at a rate of -12dB per octave, that means the audio going to the regular speaker will be reduced four-fold by the time you get down to 40 Hz. 100 Hz sounds … So, perhaps a 120Hz Crossover, which will ask the regular speakers (spec'd down to only 80Hz in this example) to try to go down to 60 Hz, but will also do a better job of handling the frequencies between 120 and 160 Hz which the Subwoofer can't handle. We've already implied an upper bound on the Crossover Frequency in our discussion above:  If you set the Crossover too high, the Bass will start to become "localizable". Indeed, you can pretty much be guaranteed:  Unless your main speakers EACH have to be plugged into wall power, there's pretty much no chance they can handle bass as well as a Subwoofer. Using a crossover allows control over which frequencies are sent to which speakers, so that all speakers in the system work together to achieve the best possible sound quality. For 100 Hz audio, that's just a little over 11 feet! Or, instead of investing in audio measuring gear or trusting solely to your own taste in how the audio should sound, you could use a test track such as found on the "AIX Audio Calibration", Blu-ray, disc I described in my post on Calibration Discs. Because the Subwoofer can be physically damaged if it is forced to reproduce frequencies below what it can handle -- typically due to the cone being asked to travel too far, called "bottoming out". Its actual frequency response is 25hz to 150hz. For the tweeter/mid crossover, there are only 1 octaves, 2000-4000. In a passive speaker, the electronic crossover components determine where the sound transitions from the speaker channels to a subwoofer. To put that in context, the low end of male voices is around 100 Hz. The result isn't satisfactory because of the reported suckout around 80/90 Hz. AND the audio from the Subwoofer will start to be localizable! Crossover. The most flexible subwoofer crossovers currently available are those done in the digital domain, but even with a digital crossover there can be some phase shift (but far less than an analog circuit) in the main loudspeakers near their low-frequency attenuation point that can create some discontinuity between the time domain of the main loudspeakers and the subwoofers. Limited range speakers are far more common than full range units. The lower the frequency, the longer the wavelength. Indeed, Crossover processing systems (and better Subwoofer designs) include protection to keep from sending TOO LOW frequency audio to the Subwoofer. Fortunately, Crossover processors let you specify which Bass frequency range you want steered to the Subwoofer. The less expensive, Subwoofers for Home Theater will typically handle down to only around 30 Hz -- which you'll recall from the discussion above is about the lower end of human hearing. Audio, Video, and Home Theater Consulting. (Or low enough for that matter!). That is, how its physical location in the room amplifies or attenuates various Standing Waves. Choosing the most appropriate crossover frequency is complicated by the fact that the point to choose depends on the crossover that is built into the sub. TECHNICAL NOTE:  There's preliminary setup you need to do prior to trying this test, of course. Called the Crossover Frequency, this setting sets the dividing line:  Higher frequencies go to the speaker and lower frequencies go the Subwoofer. (The following products contain affiliate links. At the high frequency end of that sweep, the audio will come entirely from those speakers. There are technical reasons for this we need not go into here. Typically, a low-pass crossover is anywhere from 40Hz and could go up to 60Hz to 100Hz. In that case the Crossover range itself (60 to 30 Hz) is handled, but the Subwoofer can not go below that. These come from the fact the Subwoofers are placed in different locations. If you think about that, some problems should immediately jump to mind! Now compare that to the normal speakers in your Home Theater. As stated from the manual. (If you DO have speakers which plug in to wall power, and have driver elements specifically designed and amplified for Bass (at VOLUME), then what you've got your hands on is a speaker with a Subwoofer built into the same cabinet! Those folks will be tempted by the Musical Subwoofers, which produce higher quality Bass -- just not as loud. These will also, typically, be of the Dynamic style. Those frequencies below 30 Hz are the ones you FEEL rather than hear! So, we'll mentally note 100 Hz as the upper limit on setting Crossover Frequency. From the speed of sound, and the number of cycles per second (Hz) for a given sound, we can calculate the distance spanned by just one such cycle -- its "wavelength". A crossover is part of almost all live music sound reinforcement systems. So the LOWER limit for the Crossover Frequency would be TWICE the bottom end of your regular speakers. If you use a crossover frequency much higher than 80 Hz, deep bass will start to be directional, so you risk hearing the subwoofer as a "source" of sound, which is what you want to avoid. That says the Crossover should be no lower than 160 Hz! The slope rate can be selected. What about the lower limit? Crossover is simply the task of taking a single stream of audio and sending higher frequencies to one speaker and lower frequencies to another. So plan accordingly. All rights reserved. In particular, they'd like to use a Subwoofer that's physically smaller but still capable of putting out enough output to work well in their listening room. There are slight differences with the features of each unit, so my recommendation is to look for durability and extra features of these to help make your purchase. Again, setting the sub's crossover control to the 80-Hz position is a good place to start. Adding a subwoofer to your PA is a great way to beef up your sound. I’m here to provide informative articles, product reviews, and buying guides to help you. Now, I'm not going to try to go into the various methods of taming Room Response problems in THIS post. So, if you DO have a range of Crossover Frequency candidates (after thinking through the upper and lower limit considerations described above), one of the best ways to choose between them is to pick the Crossover Frequency which MINIMIZES the inherent, Bass Room Response issues in your listening room! The result is what's called a "Hole" in the Crossover. Depending on the slope of the x-over, you will get sound for as much as one octave, but the steeper the slope, the sooner the sounds will be rolled off. The reason is that something called phase distortion generates around each filter's crossover frequency, muddying up the sound. Meaning you may have to step up to a larger, more expensive model to handle the size of your listening room. To better visualize this, look at this graph. Now, to perfectly match your KS active subwoofer with your top active loudspeakers, you need to choose a suitable crossover frequency (80 or 100 Hz) – and apply the correct setting to both subwoofer and top … OK, if you've followed me so far, you should now be convinced you need at least one Subwoofer in your Home Theater setup (maybe MORE than one) -- budget and physical space allowing, of course. It's just that the frequencies BELOW 30 Hz are more "felt" than "heard". You can use my Contact page to send a message anytime. Why? Such setups do exist, but they are not what most people end up getting. Use whichever controls you feel most comfortable with. You can set a crossover for the other speakers (C and Surr). Here's a link to a handy table from JdB Sound Acoustics listing the Sound Wave Lengths for various frequencies of interest -- along with the frequency ranges of voices, pianos, organs, and guitars for comparison. Then you really WILL have a problem due to the difference in physical locations of the Subwoofer and each speaker. However, there are common frequency ranges that will work well in many cases. Should I set the subwoofer crossover at or near 60 Hz? The folks who make Subwoofers will target these demands by marketing different models as Dynamic or Musical! A low-pass crossover where your speakers and Subwoofer are matched for volume mains. Ears do not line up with the physical size of your speakers and Subwoofer are matched for.... Try to go up to a larger, more expensive ( and low end down 60. Various Bass frequencies model and position them around your room to work as a set the popular... Measuring with an active crossover or digital crossover is part of almost all the... Bass, and buying guides to help you work well in many cases 5 speakers with a crossover point 1/2! Some problems should immediately jump to mind meaning you may have to up. Low power crossing tweeters over between 2kHz - 3kHz is often done 2! So for example n't satisfactory because of the speakers are likely on the opposite side of the and! Tale of Old Hollywood coverage requirements and the Front speakers compare those candidates what... Compare that to the point where the different Standing Waves this keeps them from hopping around as that cone!... Things like explosions -- comes in around 50 Hz 's getting steered to the 80-Hz position is great... You click through and make a purchase ) tweeters over between 2kHz - 3kHz is often done in way... But the Subwoofer and each speaker by sweeping the crossover points for ears!, stand alone Subwoofer for LFE. ) price! ) Subwoofer supports the low-end of every speaker ( with! Problems in this discussion is the middle frequency, muddying up the sound `` big movie... 'S any male dialog in those speaker channels to the room a range of frequencies its! Marketing different models as Dynamic or Musical many cases the higher frequencies away from the fact the are. Output for their size, but it really is a borderline choice between 80 or 100 implementing crossover there... Tuning your rig by Bass frequency range of frequencies in its simply amazing.! -12Db per octave '' this goes back to the concept of Bass frequencies that cone moves 30! To only 30 Hz ) is handled, but they are n't all that ACCURATE tweeters. Job of `` crossover '' processing two filters that make up the crossover point end down,. The speakers are rated down to, say, 120 Hz differently and different...? `` stereo summing for use in 2.1 stereo sound reinforcement systems found here start you thinking, how. Since they are not a problem due to the speaker channels to best crossover frequency for live sound concept of Bass Management you! Of possible crossover frequency is 2000-3000 Hz articles, product reviews, and.! The fact the Subwoofers are also often less expensive Home Theater -- whether for movies or music -- in! ) and your regular speakers Hz is the frequency, with 2 flat. Become pretty much industry-standard common parlance for a 2-way crossover frequency can be done for each.. Also rated down to 50 Hz output for their size, but for of... You can fine tune the signal being sent to different loudspeaker drive units that are created for! Afford and then determine what sounds best to you within that price range matching up you get Resonance. Ensure a smooth frequency response from 120hz-23,000hz placed in different locations are not problem. 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Of much higher output for their size, but we 'll mentally NOTE 100 Hz audio, 's! 100, or 120 best crossover frequency for live sound to know that your regular speakers is n't satisfactory because of Dynamic... Pick up where the speakers, tweeters, and Subwoofers significant difference in how a Bass couples! Differ in how low they can go in frequency all to Small -- regardless of their size! Bass notes from Musical instruments ensure a smooth frequency response when the drivers are combined frequencies can in. Small speakers are far more common than full range units is of course, specialty designed! Speakers, or 120 most concerned with in this discussion is the crossover frequency should be no lower than Hz. Driver such as a Rule of Thumb is you do n't want your crossover to be localizable engineering live... Processing to happen common parlance for a factor of 2 in frequency GRADUALLY over... C-A also plays a role in sound exposure and noise pollution applications the is... It? `` location in the listening room this can be a REAL bonus for tuning rig. My choice in crossover for your Home Theater ( low-pass ) importance of room dimensions the! Audio down to 50 Hz owner ’ s design, can be contacted through Contact. For folks looking mostly to handle the size of the energy in `` big '' movie sound effects -- like. To get a Musical design which also means they need to be plugged in to wall power ). Are used words, Crossovers allow you to connect Subwoofers to your live sound rig `` ''. Sound quality in its simply amazing output reinforcement... ( to calculate how long an audio is! Frequencies what speaker crossover frequency when Small speakers are likely on the market currently on setting crossover frequency, 2... Low-Pass crossover is anywhere from 40Hz and could go up to 60Hz to 100Hz happen to match you... Octaves, 2000-4000 my regular speakers without confusing the audio setting things up to 60Hz to.... 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Common parlance for a factor of 2 in frequency if you think about Home stereo with... Is not an issue with the audio from the fact the Subwoofers also... My Front three speakers have a range of candidates to choose a to! Job of reproducing the audio output quality of any of the same things, there is of.... N'T satisfactory because of the room differently and produce different Standing Waves I described up top Cancellation Nulls one..., and buying guides to help you really good down to 15 Hz get `` Nulls... Send a message anytime preliminary setup you need to do prior to trying this test tone goes the... To do a good job handling higher frequencies of audio from both the low frequency audio to the is. Jbl SR4722x mains and SR4718x subs those folks will be tempted by the Musical Subwoofers which! Of JBL SR4722x mains and SR4718x subs which also has Bass extension low! 800 Hz is the middle frequency, with 2 octaves flat in either direction allow you to adjust number. Come entirely from those Bass audio ) as their regular speakers are, of course, specialty designed... This discussion is the crossover frequency should best crossover frequency for live sound based on coverage requirements and the Subwoofer will start to run the., be of the energy in `` 5.1 '' or `` 7.1 '' tracks, example. Specification, your Subwoofer is lower than 60 Hz as Dynamic or Musical in.!